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Digital colonialism, surveillance capitalism, and a libre software future

Hosted by Jose Castro.

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Summary

Why are most mainstream platforms free of charge? Why is the answer to this first question a threat to humanity's future? What can we do about it? With a historic perspective, citing authors like Shoshana Zuboff, Marshall McLuhan, and Yanis Varoufakis, I try to give a perspective of how dystopian digital platforms nowadays are personal data extraction machines, how this machine works, the power of media (after S.Freud and E.Bernays), and why it is so critical for the future of humanity to choose libre software and ethical platforms.

Biography

Jose Castro has been a GNU/Linux user since 2001. Jose has worked sporadically on computer areas as web developer, monkey and programmer. He also works on permaculture design and land development. Since the pandemic Jose has been solo campaigning for libre software and ethical use of digital platforms with the aim of non-techie people, giving talks and generating material. You can check out Jose's website if you want to know more.

Added

12 months ago

Tagged with

video · LibrePlanet 2023 video · FSF · LibrePlanet 2023 · LibrePlanet · lp2023 · libreplanet-conference · charting-the-course · workshop

License

CC BY-SA 4.0

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This talk was presented at LibrePlanet.

libreplanet.org


LibrePlanet is the Free Software Foundation's annual conference. The FSF campaigns for free/libre software, meaning it respects users' freedom and community. We believe that users are entitled to this; all software should be free.

gnu.org/important


We do not advocate "open source".

That term was coined to reject our views. It refers to similar practices, but usually presented solely as advantageous, without talking of right and wrong.

gnu.org/not-open-source


Richard Stallman launched the free software movement in 1983 by announcing development of the free operating system, GNU. By 1992, GNU was nearly operational; one major essential component was lacking, the kernel.

gnu.org/gnu-begin


In 1992, Torvalds freed the kernel Linux, which filled the last gap in GNU. Since then, the combined GNU/Linux system has run in millions of computers. Nowadays you can buy a new computer with a totally free GNU/Linux system preinstalled.

gnu.org/gnu-and-linux


The views of the speaker may not represent the Free Software Foundation. The Foundation supports the free software cause and freedom to share, and basic freedoms in the digital domain, but has no position on other political issues.