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Pump.io - The federated, extensible social network

Alex Jordan

Pump.io is a promising project to create a federated social network - think email, where you can have multiple providers that all work together, but for social networking. It stagnated for a while, but the project has recently completed the transfer of governance and code maintenance to the community. This presentation will talk about pump.io's history (right up to its newly-created community governance), its API, and why it's pretty freakin' neat. We'll end with the work that's gone out the door in recent releases, the work that remains, and how you can (should?) get involved. Attendees will walk out with an understanding of the historical context behind pump.io, an understanding of how the software works on a technical level, and how it fits into wider social web efforts. No prior knowledge necessary, although a basic familiarity with JSON and HTTP will help.

Slides: https://media.libreplanet.org/u/libreplanet/m/pump-io-the-federated-extensible-social-network-slides/

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2 years, 2 months ago

Tagged with

video · lp2017 · LibrePlanet · LibrePlanet 2017 · LibrePlanet 2017 video

License

CC BY-SA 4.0

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This talk was presented at LibrePlanet.

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LibrePlanet is the Free Software Foundation's annual conference. The FSF campaigns for free/libre software, meaning it respects users' freedom and community. We believe that users are entitled to this; all software should be free.

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