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Installing Ourselves into LibrePlanet

Hosted by Cristina Cochior, Karl Moubarak, and Jara Rocha of The Cell for Digital Discomfort

A workshop session to map out each of our current conditions of connecting and being together, the physical-political, and technological conditions using a diagrammatic methodology.

The workshop is geared towards installing ourselves into the conference's infrastructural spectralities by sharing, learning from and attuning to each others' conditions for connectivity, online participation and basic computer-mediated mundane day-to-day life. We want to pose this affirmation as an initial trigger: installing is about situating — attuning to our network of (inter-)dependencies and attuning to the dependencies with our local and vernacular but also standardized and planetary networks.

This workshop was created in the context of the Fellowship for Situated Practice organized by BAK.

Biography

The Cell for Digital Discomfort (CfDD) is interested in developing practices that would go towards something like “solidary discomfort” by circulating questions and experiments that deal with turbo-capitalist domination, linear solutionism, and seamless operations. CfDD wants to stay with the unease despite too-comfortable modes of infrastructural becoming, in order to intersectionally imagine ways to refuse compliance with totalitarian innovation, and to do so in a more explicit conversation with crip techno-science, anti-colonialism, queer struggles, and environmental justice.

https://www.fsf.org/events/libreplanet-workshop-may-23-installing-ourselves-into-libreplanet

Added

5 months ago

Tagged with

LibrePlanet 2022 workshop · workshop · Living Liberation · LibrePlanet conference · LibrePlanet 2022 video · LibrePlanet 2022 · LibrePlanet · lp2022 · video · FSF

License

CC BY-SA 4.0

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This talk was presented at LibrePlanet.

libreplanet.org


LibrePlanet is the Free Software Foundation's annual conference. The FSF campaigns for free/libre software, meaning it respects users' freedom and community. We believe that users are entitled to this; all software should be free.

gnu.org/important


We do not advocate "open source".

That term was coined to reject our views. It refers to similar practices, but usually presented solely as advantageous, without talking of right and wrong.

gnu.org/not-open-source


Richard Stallman launched the free software movement in 1983 by announcing development of the free operating system, GNU. By 1992, GNU was nearly operational; one major essential component was lacking, the kernel.

gnu.org/gnu-begin


In 1992, Torvalds freed the kernel Linux, which filled the last gap in GNU. Since then, the combined GNU/Linux system has run in millions of computers. Nowadays you can buy a new computer with a totally free GNU/Linux system preinstalled.

gnu.org/gnu-and-linux


The views of the speaker may not represent the Free Software Foundation. The Foundation supports the free software cause and freedom to share, and basic freedoms in the digital domain, but has no position on other political issues.